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PERSONAL PROTECTION ORDERS AND FAMILY VIOLENCE

If you are facing family violence, you can apply for a Personal Protection Order (“PPO”) restraining the person against whom the order is made from using family violence. 

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If you are facing family violence, you can apply for a Personal Protection Order (“PPO”) restraining the person against whom the order is made from using family violence. The application may be made by the family member concerned, or by a guardian or relative if that family member is below the age of 21 years. The court may grant the PPO upon satisfaction, on a balance of probabilities, that family violence has been committed or is likely to be committed against you and that such order is necessary.

According to section 64 of the Women’s Charter (Cap 353), “family violence” is defined as follows:

  • Wilfully or knowingly placing, or attempting to place, a family member in fear of hurt;
  • Causing hurt to a family member by such act which is known or ought to have been known would result in hurt;
  • Wrongfully confining or restraining a family member against his will; or
  • Causing continual harassment with intent to cause or knowing that it is likely to cause anguish to a family member.

You may apply for a PPO at the Family Protection Centre at the Family Justice Courts or to a Family Violence Specialist Centre.

Other orders you may also apply for are Expedited Orders (“EO”) or Domestic Exclusion Order (“DEO”). An EO is a temporary PPO given if there is imminent danger and lasts for 28 days from the date it was served on the respondent while a DEO excludes or restricts the respondent from entering the applicant’s residence or parts of the residence.

A breach of any of the above orders is a criminal offence and the individual is liable to a fine or imprisonment.

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Seeking legal protection

Protection Orders are available to protect the following parties:

  • Spouse or former spouse;
  • A child, including step and adopted children;
  • Father, mother, in-laws or siblings of the offender;
  • Any other relative or person who is unable to look after him or herself and is in the opinion of the Court that he or she should be regarded as a member of the family.

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Related Articles:

What is family violence?

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