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WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU DON’T MAKE A WILL?

If you do not make a will, you would not be able to exercise any control over the distribution of your estate.   The distribution of your estate would follow fixed rules outlined in Section 7 of the Intestate Succession Act.

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SINGAPORE WILLS LAWYER – WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU DON’T MAKE A WILL?

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If you pass away without making a will, your next-of-kin may apply to Court for a Grant of Letters of Administration in order to administer the distribution of your estate. Unfortunately, the application for a Grant of Letters of Administration is more costly than an application for a Grant of Probate (when there is a will) and is a lengthier process as well.

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Additionally, if you do not make a will, you would not be able to exercise any control over the distribution of your estate.   The distribution of your estate would follow fixed rules outlined in Section 7 of the Intestate Succession Act, which are summarised below.

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  1. If you had left behind your spouse (no children or parent)

The whole share of the estate would go to your surviving spouse.

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  1. If you had left behind your spouse and children 

 

Half of your estate would go to your surviving spouse, while the other half would be shared equally among your children.

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  1. If you had left behind your children (no spouse)

The whole share of your estate is to be shared equally among your children.

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  1. If you had left behind your spouse and a parent or both parents (no children)

Half of your estate would go to your surviving spouse, while the other half would be shared equally amongst your surviving parents.

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  1. If you had left behind a parent or both parents (no spouse and no children)

If both your parents are still alive, the whole of your estate would be shared equally between them. If you only have one surviving parent, he or she would take the whole share of your estate.

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  1. If you had left behind siblings or children of deceased siblings (no surviving spouse, children, or parents)

The whole of your estate would be shared equally amongst your siblings and, where they have already passed away, their children.

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  1. If you had left behind grandparents (no surviving spouse, children or descendants of deceased children, parents, or siblings or descendants of deceased siblings)

If both your grandparents are still alive, the whole of your estate would be shared equally between them. If you only have one surviving grandparent, he or she would take the whole share of your estate.

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  1. If you had left behind uncles and aunts (no surviving spouse, children or descendants of deceased children, parents, siblings or descendants of deceased siblings, or grandparents)

The whole of your estate would be shared equally amongst your uncles and aunts.

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IF NONE OF THE SITUATIONS ABOVE HAPPEN

 .In default of distribution in accordance with the above, the Government shall be entitled to the whole of your estate.

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THE ABOVE ILLUSTRATES WHY YOU SHOULD ALWAYS MAKE A WILL

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To avoid the unpleasant situation where you are unable to give to or provide for the people whom you love dearly, you should make a will. Further, it is much simpler for a will to be administered, and you would save your family members plenty of unnecessary stress.

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Our team of experienced lawyers at PKWA Law Practice LLC can assist you to make your will quickly and at affordable rates. Contact us now at +65 6854 5336 to schedule an appointment.  Our fees for a simple Will starts from $350.

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Keen to discuss more? Contact PKWA Law today for your free consultation.
Call Us At +65 6854 5336
(Family Law)
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(Conveyancing)
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